Burns, Baby, Burns: Haggis-Making Masterclass For Two At Mac & Wild

  • Add an extra guest +
    £40

Burns, Baby, Burns: Haggis-Making Masterclass For Two At Mac & Wild

Spitalfields, London

£80
  • Add an extra guest +
    £40
Valid for 1 years

“Scotland at its finest, this masterclass is a total game changer!” Evening Standard

Why we love it

Nothing conjures up images of burly Scottish men in rugged Highland landscapes than haggis. Yes, it gets a bad rep but when made correctly, haggis is something of a delicacy packed full of meaty goodness. Learn the secrets of Scotland’s proud dish and go home with your own haggis on this masterclass with the expert purveyors of fine Scottish produce, Mac & Wild.

What's Included?

  • Enjoy a Haggis-Making Masterclass for two at Mac & Wild Devonshire Square
  • Learn basic knife skills, the process of making and cooking haggis and the secrets and magic of one of Scotland’s finest delicacies
  • Prepare your very own haggis chieftain to take home (per couple)

Description

Despite popular belief, many countries make and eat haggis. However it was the Scottish poet, Robert Burns, who coined Scotland as THE haggis nation, due to his own love of the food. After he passed away in 1796, his friends honoured him with an annual dinner – the centrepiece being haggis.

To know what’s really in haggis makes it that much more enjoyable. Haggis is mostly always based on the pluck (heart, liver, lungs) of the animal. The pluck is the first thing to rot on a beast. Historically, when the clan would go out hunting or the farmers would drive their cattle from the Highlands to the market in Edinburgh, they would need to eat. They would kill a beast and make a haggis – probably continuing to carry the carcass to the market to sell on.

Making haggis is a form of preserving the meat. The pluck is boiled up and chopped in to tiny pieces. This prolongs the life of the meat to a couple of weeks, as opposed to a couple of days in its raw state. The contents are then mixed together with spices, oatmeal and onions and stuffed inside a bag-like pouch (traditionally the stomach of a sheep) before being tied at both ends ready for cooking.

During your haggis-making course at Mac & Wild, you’ll enjoy an hour-long class, learning the process, secrets and magic of one of Scotland’s finest delicacies, as well as preparing your very own haggis chieftain to take home to share. After your class, feel free to relax in the bar, sip on a drink or order a few nibbles from the menu as you enjoy a walk on the Scottish wild side.

Description

Despite popular belief, many countries make and eat haggis. However it was the Scottish poet, Robert Burns, who coined Scotland as THE haggis nation, due to his own love of the food. After he passed away in 1796, his friends honoured him with an annual dinner – the centrepiece being haggis.

To know what’s really in haggis makes it that much more enjoyable. Haggis is mostly always based on the pluck (heart, liver, lungs) of the animal. The pluck is the first thing to rot on a beast. Historically, when the clan would go out hunting or the farmers would drive their cattle from the Highlands to the market in Edinburgh, they would need to eat. They would kill a beast and make a haggis – probably continuing to carry the carcass to the market to sell on.

Making haggis is a form of preserving the meat. The pluck is boiled up and chopped in to tiny pieces. This prolongs the life of the meat to a couple of weeks, as opposed to a couple of days in its raw state. The contents are then mixed together with spices, oatmeal and onions and stuffed inside a bag-like pouch (traditionally the stomach of a sheep) before being tied at both ends ready for cooking.

During your haggis-making course at Mac & Wild, you’ll enjoy an hour-long class, learning the process, secrets and magic of one of Scotland’s finest delicacies, as well as preparing your very own haggis chieftain to take home to share. After your class, feel free to relax in the bar, sip on a drink or order a few nibbles from the menu as you enjoy a walk on the Scottish wild side.

Additional Information

This experience must be booked within 6 months of purchase, but you can choose to go any time within 1 year.

Availability:

This experience is available:

  • Wednesdays at 7pm

This experience is not available on bank holidays and other special occasion days such as Valentine’s Day.

Other Useful Details:

Bookings are subject to availability. We advise booking at least 4 weeks in advance to guarantee the desired date and time.

Additional Information

This experience must be booked within 6 months of purchase, but you can choose to go any time within 1 year.

Availability:

This experience is available:

  • Wednesdays at 7pm

This experience is not available on bank holidays and other special occasion days such as Valentine’s Day.

Other Useful Details:

Bookings are subject to availability. We advise booking at least 4 weeks in advance to guarantee the desired date and time.

What's Included?

  • Enjoy a Haggis-Making Masterclass for two at Mac & Wild Devonshire Square
  • Learn basic knife skills, the process of making and cooking haggis and the secrets and magic of one of Scotland’s finest delicacies
  • Prepare your very own haggis chieftain to take home (per couple)

Why we love it

Nothing conjures up images of burly Scottish men in rugged Highland landscapes than haggis. Yes, it gets a bad rep but when made correctly, haggis is something of a delicacy packed full of meaty goodness. Learn the secrets of Scotland’s proud dish and go home with your own haggis on this masterclass with the expert purveyors of fine Scottish produce, Mac & Wild. Read full description

Description

Despite popular belief, many countries make and eat haggis. However it was the Scottish poet, Robert Burns, who coined Scotland as THE haggis nation, due to his own love of the food. After he passed away in 1796, his friends honoured him with an annual dinner – the centrepiece being haggis.

To know what’s really in haggis makes it that much more enjoyable. Haggis is mostly always based on the pluck (heart, liver, lungs) of the animal. The pluck is the first thing to rot on a beast. Historically, when the clan would go out hunting or the farmers would drive their cattle from the Highlands to the market in Edinburgh, they would need to eat. They would kill a beast and make a haggis – probably continuing to carry the carcass to the market to sell on.

Making haggis is a form of preserving the meat. The pluck is boiled up and chopped in to tiny pieces. This prolongs the life of the meat to a couple of weeks, as opposed to a couple of days in its raw state. The contents are then mixed together with spices, oatmeal and onions and stuffed inside a bag-like pouch (traditionally the stomach of a sheep) before being tied at both ends ready for cooking.

During your haggis-making course at Mac & Wild, you’ll enjoy an hour-long class, learning the process, secrets and magic of one of Scotland’s finest delicacies, as well as preparing your very own haggis chieftain to take home to share. After your class, feel free to relax in the bar, sip on a drink or order a few nibbles from the menu as you enjoy a walk on the Scottish wild side.

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Description

Despite popular belief, many countries make and eat haggis. However it was the Scottish poet, Robert Burns, who coined Scotland as THE haggis nation, due to his own love of the food. After he passed away in 1796, his friends honoured him with an annual dinner – the centrepiece being haggis.

To know what’s really in haggis makes it that much more enjoyable. Haggis is mostly always based on the pluck (heart, liver, lungs) of the animal. The pluck is the first thing to rot on a beast. Historically, when the clan would go out hunting or the farmers would drive their cattle from the Highlands to the market in Edinburgh, they would need to eat. They would kill a beast and make a haggis – probably continuing to carry the carcass to the market to sell on.

Making haggis is a form of preserving the meat. The pluck is boiled up and chopped in to tiny pieces. This prolongs the life of the meat to a couple of weeks, as opposed to a couple of days in its raw state. The contents are then mixed together with spices, oatmeal and onions and stuffed inside a bag-like pouch (traditionally the stomach of a sheep) before being tied at both ends ready for cooking.

During your haggis-making course at Mac & Wild, you’ll enjoy an hour-long class, learning the process, secrets and magic of one of Scotland’s finest delicacies, as well as preparing your very own haggis chieftain to take home to share. After your class, feel free to relax in the bar, sip on a drink or order a few nibbles from the menu as you enjoy a walk on the Scottish wild side.

Opening Times

Wednesdays at 7pm

Additional Information

This experience must be booked within 6 months of purchase, but you can choose to go any time within 1 year.

Availability:

This experience is available:

  • Wednesdays at 7pm

This experience is not available on bank holidays and other special occasion days such as Valentine’s Day.

Other Useful Details:

Bookings are subject to availability. We advise booking at least 4 weeks in advance to guarantee the desired date and time.

How it works

  • Choose your experience

    Treat yourself or share with someone you truly care about.

  • We arrange everything

    Our concierge will arrange everything, even the little extras.

  • Relax and enjoy

    Simply show up and savour the memory that will last a lifetime.

Burns, Baby, Burns: Haggis-Making Masterclass For Two At Mac & Wild

  • Add an extra guest +
    £40